Video 30 Sep 2 notes

The brand that made coffee a must have in many countries that never really care for it in the first place, wants you to know that they are there for you, now and always. 

The coffee giant rolled out its first global brand campaign on Monday. And the focus is very much not on Starbucks (well, kind of not on Starbucks) but on the millions of people who get together at its stores every day—and the stories they have to tell.

The feel-good theme is “Meet me at Starbucks,” and the centerpiece—a five-minute-plus mini documentary by 72andSunny—shows people doing just that. It was culled from 220 hours of footage filmed in a single 24-hour period in 59 Starbucks stores (including the one I visited this morning, on Astor Place in New York) in 28 countries by 39 local filmmakers and 10 local photographers.

We get to visit everywhere from Rio de Janeiro to Bogota, Singapore to Beijing, Mumbai to Toronto, Paris to Berlin to Istanbul. And the bonhomie—like your latte—appears to be much the same wherever you go. [September 29 2014]

If nothing else, they have created an ad that taps into a truth of the brand; whether or not you can bring yourself to drink their coffee, Starbuck’s outlets are a communal focal point. It is an easy to find place to meet, to get that last desperate drop of caffeine, or to buy that Father’s Day present you nearly forgot to get. 

Photo 30 Sep One of the few attempts at referencing our digital habits that does not make you feel like bitch slapping the brand in question. Part of that comes down to not wanting to dismiss an ad for breast cancer awareness, and part of it comes down to fact that this is a rare ad that more or less gets it right. There are a great many things that could be sold using this logic and we should be happy that this is the brand/cause to make the most of it.

One of the few attempts at referencing our digital habits that does not make you feel like bitch slapping the brand in question. Part of that comes down to not wanting to dismiss an ad for breast cancer awareness, and part of it comes down to fact that this is a rare ad that more or less gets it right. There are a great many things that could be sold using this logic and we should be happy that this is the brand/cause to make the most of it.

Video 30 Sep

Dole determined the winners of special trophy bananas by lottery, but even the boring, textless bananas available to all the runners were still “Gokusen,” or the high-end kind that can cost $12 a bunch—or as much as $6 per banana with special gift packaging.

Then again, in a culture where gift giving is prevalent, and where supermarkets therefore tend to carry $300 cantaloupes—and where even more special melons have sold for  $16,000—a pricey banana starts to sound like a total steal. [September 29 2014]

This whole thing is just, well, bananas! But I can see the potential for this to promote a great many other things besides exorbitantly priced fruit. Why? Think about it. For the cost of the printer, ink, staff hours and anywhere between $2-$6 for each of the 200 bananas, they achieved more than some do with a media spend of a million or more. 

Video 29 Sep

I have to admit, this attempt to put a wryer, dryer tone to the standard lottery ads has its charm. It plays with the idea of invincibility one gains when your bank balance errs toward the 6 or 7 digit range. Though the real punch needed to sell the overall notion is somehow not there - if you’re going to sell the idea of being rich and evil, do it with conviction.

Video 29 Sep 1 note

The armoury of the average advertiser has an untold level of depth and breadth. There is no limit to the tricks and tactics we can and will utilise in our war on your wallet. 

Video 27 Sep 2 notes

Forever the standard angle of selling the idea of reading, escapism never really seems to lose its sheen. Every time, whatever the agency, publisher or book store, a new copy approach is found to sell the power of one’s imagination.

Naturally, the reason I am forever in love with such ads (as I’ve stated before) is the combination of solid copy and the impetus on getting people to read. The world would be a vastly different place if more people took the time to read a good book (other than/instead of/on top of their chosen religious text or TV guide).

Ok, I’m getting preachy.

Photo 27 Sep 1 note IKEA gold! This idea from Leo Burnett is just brilliant. They have effectively combined Ikea’s most noted pieces of marketing collateral with a tool to solve the average consumer’s biggest worry - will it fit? Bada bing bada boom!

IKEA gold! This idea from Leo Burnett is just brilliant. They have effectively combined Ikea’s most noted pieces of marketing collateral with a tool to solve the average consumer’s biggest worry - will it fit? Bada bing bada boom!

Photo 26 Sep 3 notes  As always, typography is copy’s creative co-conspirator, intent on altering your perspective. This results in an ad that is simple, direct and copy driven - essentially everything I love in a good ad.

 As always, typography is copy’s creative co-conspirator, intent on altering your perspective. This results in an ad that is simple, direct and copy driven - essentially everything I love in a good ad.

Photo 26 Sep It’s no wonder Tourism Queensland resorted to such a ‘classy’ tactic back, what with so many of us preferring to ditch the local surf and sand for bigger and bolder destinations across the sea. Stunts such as this guarantee people take notice of the ad and that the press report it with zeal (both News Ltd & Fairfax gave it a spin). Back when this was done (2010), this would have garnered more than its share of social media buzz - despite not having the more visual centric sharing power of Instagram (this was pre-Android Insta).
And yet, to this day, Queensland has yet to garner the same degree of interest as any of the other Australian states. Is it because we lack a worthwhile product? Maybe. Or is it because our marketing gets overshadowed by our interstate competition? Definitely. While every other state has something to tie into the growing food and culture angle, Queensland clings to the vision of being nothing but sun, surf and skin. Outside of the Best Job In The World campaign, Queensland hasn’t had a truly remarkable message in a very, very long time. Try harder, dammnit!!

It’s no wonder Tourism Queensland resorted to such a ‘classy’ tactic back, what with so many of us preferring to ditch the local surf and sand for bigger and bolder destinations across the sea. Stunts such as this guarantee people take notice of the ad and that the press report it with zeal (both News Ltd & Fairfax gave it a spin). Back when this was done (2010), this would have garnered more than its share of social media buzz - despite not having the more visual centric sharing power of Instagram (this was pre-Android Insta).

And yet, to this day, Queensland has yet to garner the same degree of interest as any of the other Australian states. Is it because we lack a worthwhile product? Maybe. Or is it because our marketing gets overshadowed by our interstate competition? Definitely. While every other state has something to tie into the growing food and culture angle, Queensland clings to the vision of being nothing but sun, surf and skin. Outside of the Best Job In The World campaign, Queensland hasn’t had a truly remarkable message in a very, very long time. Try harder, dammnit!!

Video 26 Sep 1 note

This is the perfect example of how the backing track can make or break an ad. Sans the William Shatner spoken word rendition of Bohemian Rhapsody, this would be just another generic travel ad; with the song, it something that not only stays with you, but is worth sharing. Gotta love the Shat.


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